4 comments

World’s First High Definition microphone for notebooks and broadband mobile devices

by Dhiram Shah

Akustica today introduced the first High Definition Microphone that enables HD voice quality in laptop PCs and other broadband mobile devices. The AKU2103 is a digital-output microphone with a guaranteed wideband frequency response. It is the first digital microphone to guarantee compliance with the TIA-920 audio performance requirement for wideband transmission in applications such as Voiceover-Internet Protocol (VoIP).


The surface-mountable Akustica AKU2103 HD Microphone is the first under mount digital microphone to provide a L/R-user select function that allows a single device to be configured as either a left or a right microphone.This industry standard stereo output is supported by multiple HD Audio and universal serial bus USB) Audio CODECs. The AKU2103 is a high-definition microphone for notebooks and other broadband mobile devices.

4 Comments

  1. Dr. C

    Why would they call this a _High-Definition_ microphone? I’m sure the sound of a nice studio mic (e.g. Shure SM7B) is ten times better then the sound from this! But according to this article that would be a ‘standerd definition’ mic?

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  2. ExitPass

    a shure would give better quality, but this is aimed at those who don’t want to haul around a mic, cable and interface such as an MBox or other audio interface, or even a USB mic such as the Blue Snowball, the Røde USB Broadcast or the Samson C01U.

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  3. Johan Krüger-Haglert

    Probably because other small surface mounted mics doesn’t provide very good sound quality?

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  4. strtj

    I think the point is that the microphone’s performance is better than previous tiny, embedded mics and not that it is meant to compete with what we think of as a standard microphone. Wikipedia talking about the TIA-920 spec states, “The standard establishes wideband audio performance requirements for wireline telephones which transmit their signals digitally. Audio wideband is defined as 150 Hz to 6800 Hz.” Obviously mics that faithfully reproduces within those frequencies have been generally available for more than 50 years, but not in this form factor.

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